According to Their Nature – Pets on the Urban Homestead

Dec. 18, 2016 by

Modern Americans love their pets!  They are often pampered and indulged as much as children are.  This is a departure from the not so distant past when the animals we now consider pets were required to be useful workers on

Hybrid is Not a Dirty Word

Dec. 8, 2016 by

I love seeds! There’s nothing sweeter on a cold and dreary Winter day than to peruse pages and pages of perfectly photographed vegetables glowing with health and not a sign of a blemish anywhere. They are a welcome reminder that

Weeds for Feed – Dandelion (Fodder Plants #6)

Dec. 5, 2016 by

(Taraxacum officinale) Nearly everyone is familiar with the green rosette and friendly yellow flowers of the dandelion, but not everyone realizes they are amazing feed for your rabbits, chickens, and goats.  These tough, determined perennials can be found everywhere, snuggling

Weeds for Feed – Chicory (Fodder Plants #5)

Dec. 4, 2016 by

(Cichorium intybus) Like a number of the fodder plants I am discussing in this series, chicory is considered a “weed” in many parts of the country.  You’ll see its lance shaped leaves growing in rosettes in late spring and it

Weeds for Feed – Comfrey (Fodder Plants #4)

Dec. 3, 2016 by

(Symphytum officinale) If you can only grow one Fodder plant for your small livestock, I would recommend comfrey.  A long lived, easy to grow perennial, comfrey is one of the few plants that offer a source of vitamin B12 and

Weeds for Feed – Jerusalem Artichoke (Fodder Plants #3)

Dec. 2, 2016 by

(Helianthus tuberosus) The third fodder plant in this series isn’t actually a perennial, but it acts like one as it re-sprouts every year from any tubers left in the ground (believe me, you won’t find them all). The Jerusalem Artichoke

Weeds for Feed – Willow (Fodder Plants #2)

Dec. 1, 2016 by

(Salix sp.) The second perennial fodder plant in this series is willow.  Willow is a common plant and has the great advantage of being able to grow in very wet, poorly drained areas that would be unsuitable for other livestock